The Best Restaurants In Yokohama Chinatown

Yokohama, the second largest city of Japan, is an exciting city and known for its futuristic port, Chinatown and relaxed atmosphere. Good versions of this yoshoku (western-inspired Japanese cuisine) should not be over greasy, and are usually served with shredded cabbage and rice, curried to make Japanese curry katsu or sandwiched between fresh white bread with a delicious sauce to lap up. It is so popular that you'll find tonkatsu being made and served all over Yokohama, with one of my favorite spots being Katsuretsu An The English menu might be the initial drawcard, but that the friendly staff and great tonkatsu is what keeps the loyal patrons coming back for more.
This style of hand-cut noodle — known in Japanese as tōshō-men and in Chinese as dao xiao mian — is the starring element in one of the neighborhood's 中華街 食べ歩き most celebrated dishes: Kyokaro's sweat-inducing spicy dan dan mian (tantan men in Japanese), which sells for just ¥900.

You'll see a lot of lion dances, loud merrymaking, firecrackers, martial arts and acrobatic performances, traditional Chinese music, and so on not only on the day itself, but also in the days shortly before and after it. A month later, the residents of Chinatown mark the end of the New Year festivities by holding the Lantern Festival , which involves a lot of lanterns being laid out in front of Masobyo, the lanterns representing guiding lights for lost souls and wishes for the year ahead.
Neighboring Kamakura, (another great day-trip from Tokyo), Kawasaki and Tokyo, Yokohama is the capital of Kanagawa Prefecture with a population of 3.7 million (the second largest in Japan after Tokyo) and is a city that has one of the most culturally varied and exciting histories of any city in Japan.
EDIT - Was too busy to add this earlier, but this successful Tokyo Gas advert indicates the prominence Chahan has in Japanese family life (it's the only meal the dad could make for his daughter when she was a child and she specifically requests it from him as a young woman going through a difficult time).

Today, Japan's Chinatowns are tourist spots and dining destinations, popular for their restaurants and "exotic" atmosphere, rather than residential areas of Chinese immigrants, although Yokohama's Chinatown, for example, is still home to several thousand residents of Chinese descent.
The names even sound similar, just like the Japanese ramen sounds similar to lo mein. From Tokyo Station, the fastest way to get to Chinatown is to take the JR Tokaido Main Line (bound for Odawara) until Yokohama Station. This Yokohama restaurant serves beloved staple items from Taiwanese food stands-from the House Special Crispy Duck,” deliciously seasoned with salt and black pepper, to Minced Pork Rice (Lu Rou Fan)”—come alive with authentic flavor.

Much of this activity is clustered around Sakuragi-cho station, the terminus of the Toyoko Line from Shibuya in downtown Tokyo, and also a stop of the Japan Railway system. This area is now becoming less and less a residential neighborhood and more and more a tourist area full of shops and restaurants of Chinese cuisine.
There are more than 600 Chinese stores and restaurants in the Chinatown, buzzing with activity from morning until late in the night. Lucky for you, we've done the digging so you don't have to. Take a look at some of Yokohama's best vegetarian (and vegan) friendly restaurants.

All the shops are popular in Japan or around the world. Throughout the year, Yokohama's Chinatown is the host of many major celebrations including their biggest festival during Chinese New Year. Japan's second largest city lies just a short 30 minute train ride south of Tokyo and makes for a great day trip from Tokyo.
You're most likely already in Tokyo to take this Yokohama day trip. I show you my Top 5 best Japanese street food in Chinatown Yokohama. At the time, it was a 53-minute ride by rail to Tokyo's Shimbashi station; today's JR train takes less than 30 minutes. As of January 1996, a registered population of twelve thousand seven hundred seventy-nine Chinese people (chuguokujin), live mostly nestled between Yokohama's famous Motomachi shopping strip, Yamashita Park, and Yokohama Stadium.
After the end of WWII, supplies from China became abundant and the area yet again flourished with many Chinese restaurants. The main attraction of the Yokohama Chinatown, however, is the cuisine offered at its many restaurants and food stands. As you walk along, take some time to explore the Chinese grocery stores selling Chinese vegetables, fruit, herbs and spices.

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